Sleep Savannah Sleep by Alistair Cross


Sleep Savannah Sleep

By: Alistair Cross
Genres: Horror, Thriller
Pages: 331
Published on: September 23, 2017
Sleep Savannah Sleep by Alistair Cross

The Dead Don't Always Rest in Peace

Jason Crandall, recently widowed, is left to raise his young daughter and rebellious teenage son on his own - and the old Victorian in Shadow Springs seems like the perfect place for them to start over. But the cracks in Jason’s new world begin to show when he meets Savannah Sturgess, a beautiful socialite who has half the men in town dancing on tangled strings.

When she goes missing, secrets begin to surface, and Jason becomes ensnared in a dangerous web that leads to murder - and he becomes a likely suspect. But who has the answers that will prove his innocence? The jealous husband who’s hell-bent on destroying him? The local sheriff with an incriminating secret? The blind old woman in the house next door who seems to watch him from the windows? Or perhaps the answers lie in the haunting visions and dreams that have recently begun to consume him.

Or maybe, Savannah herself is trying to tell him that things aren’t always as they seem and that sometimes, the dead don’t rest in peace.

Also by this author: The Crimson Corset, Mother, The Ghosts of Ravencrest

 

 

As is typical for Alistair Cross, Sleep Savannah Sleep is super creepy.

 

He has a way of giving hints along the way that make the reader wonder if he is trying to hint at who we should be looking at or not. I swear he had me considering almost everyone as a suspect at one point or another. He gives little clues along the way that if you notice them, you feel like you should get a gold star for noticing before the characters do.

 

Cross is great at creating disgusting characters. Whether they be physically disgusting or mentally depends on the story, but he never disappoints. He does have little cameo appearances by characters from other books, which I enjoy (the cameos and the books).

 

Honestly, my only complaint is that I felt it highly improbable for Savannah to contact Jason, a new guy in town, after her death. While I do understand it, I thought it was weird when there were so many other people she could have contacted.

 

There are parts in Sleep Savannah, Sleep where the imagery Cross presents reminds me of earlier Stephen King (I’m not a fan of his more recent stuff). I very rarely make author comparisons because I feel each author has his or her own piece of their soul they contribute to their story and it’s not right to really compare them. They are all individuals, but if I HAD to make the comparison, that’s where it would be.

 

Overall, Sleep Savannah, Sleep is a good mystery told by a talented writer who obviously enjoys writing the tales he tells. He is creative and knows how to keep the reader guessing. If you like ghost type mysteries, check out this book.

 

Purchase Links

Amazon

 

About Alistair Cross

About the Author

Alistair Cross' debut novel, The Crimson Corset, a vampiric tale of terror and seduction, was an immediate bestseller earning praise from veteran vampire-lit author, Chelsea Quinn Yarbro, and New York Times bestseller, Jay Bonansinga, author of The Walking Dead series. In 2012, Alistair joined forces with international bestseller, Tamara Thorne, and as Thorne & Cross, they write - among other things - the successful Gothic series, The Ravencrest Saga. Their debut collaboration, The Cliffhouse Haunting, reached the bestseller’s list in its first week of release. They are currently at work on their next solo novels and a new collaborative project.

In 2014, Alistair and Tamara began the radio show, Thorne & Cross: Haunted Nights LIVE!, which has featured such guests as Charlaine Harris of the Southern Vampire Mysteries and basis of the HBO series True Blood, Jeff Lindsay, author of the Dexter novels, Jay Bonansinga of The Walking Dead series, Laurell K. Hamilton of the Anita Blake novels, Peter Atkins, screenwriter of HELLRAISER 2, 3, and 4, worldwide bestseller V.C. Andrews, and New York Times best sellers Preston & Child, Christopher Rice, and Christopher Moore.

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