Hounded by Kelley Armstrong


Urban Enemies

By: Joseph Nassise, Jim Butcher, Kevin Hearne, Seanan McGuire, Kelley Armstrong, Jonathan Maberry, Jeff Somers
Pages: 448
Publisher: Gallery Books
Published on: August 1st 2017
Hounded by Kelley Armstrong

Villains have all the fun—everyone knows that—and this anthology takes you on a wild ride through the dark side! The top villains from sixteen urban fantasy series get their own stories—including the baddies of New York Times bestselling authors Jim Butcher, Kevin Hearne, Kelley Armstrong, Seanan McGuire, and Jonathan Maberry.

For every hero trying to save the world, there’s a villain trying to tear it all down.

In this can’t-miss anthology edited by Joseph Nassise (The Templar Chronicles), you get to plot world domination with the best of the evildoers we love to hate! This outstanding collection brings you stories told from the villains’ point of view, imparting a fresh and unique take on the evil masterminds, wicked witches, and infernal personalities that skulk in the pages of today’s most popular series.

The full anthology features stories by Jim Butcher (the Dresden Files), Kelley Armstrong (the Cainsville and Otherworld series), Seanan McGuire (October Daye), Kevin Hearne (The Iron Druid Chronicles), Jonathan Maberry (Joe Ledger), Lilith Saintcrow (Jill Kismet), Carrie Vaughn (Kitty Norville), Joseph Nassise (Templar Chronicles), C.E. Murphy (Walker Papers), Steven Savile (Glasstown), Caitlin Kittredge (the Hellhound Chronicles and the Black London series), Jeffrey Somers (The Ustari Cycle), Sam Witt (Pitchfork County), Craig Schaefer (Daniel Faust), Jon F. Merz (Lawson Vampire), Faith Hunter (Jane Yellowrock), and Diana Pharaoh Francis (Horngate Witches).

Also by this author: Urban Enemies

 

Hounded by Kelley Armstrong is the second story in the “Urban Enemies” anthology and takes place in Armstrong’s Cainsville series which is a town settled by fae. Welsh fae share the region with the Cwn Annwn, which is the Welsh version of the “Wild Hunt” beings who are tasked with hunting down killers and sending their souls to the afterlife.

 

This story is about a huntsman who had his hound taken away from him by the protagonists in the main series. Apparently, as I have not read the series, that a huntsman uses his/her (maybe her, they don’t talk about women, and the main character is a male) to assist in hunt. His first one was taken away by the head huntsmen, and his second one that he took from an abused pup to a wonderful companion was taken by a young girl. She didn’t take it away maliciously like the council did, but because the pup fell in love with her. At least that is how it sounds.

 

Anyways, this story is about the huntsman getting a hound so he can continue what he believes in the good fight. The only problem is, he isn’t like other huntsmen who wait until someone kills, he believes in trying to ensure those with the feelings also get punished.

 

That is what caused him to lose his hound in the first place, but that doesn’t stop the drive, because they are made to do what they do.

 

Like I said earlier, I have not read the series, but the overall voice is very good and I like the overall readability and world the author created. You can’t tell a lot about the overall series from a short story, but sometimes you can tell the overall series will be at least enjoyable if not very good. Also remember that while this short story is not available yet, you can pre-order the anthology or you can get Armstrong’s other books. Here are the first books in her different series.  If you want to read more about the Huntsmen before Urban Enemies comes out, then check out Omens.

 

Bitten – Yes she is the author of Bitten, which is now a show on SyFy.  This is also the first book in the Otherworld series.

Omens – First book in the Cainsville Series that this short story takes place in.

The Summoning – Darkest Powers Book 1

The Gathering – Darkness Rising Book 1

Loki’s Wolves – Blackwell Pages Book 1

 

 

 

Goodreads

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

This entry was posted in Book Reviews and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *